Conversations with Columbia: Part Five


This post is the final in a series begun in July, concerning my conversation with the Goddess Columbia. You can read the earlier installments here, here, here, and here.

My final question to Columbia was: “What do you want from your devotees?” Using the Wildwood Tarot, I pulled the Eight of Vessels: Rebirth.* The Wildwood Tarot book says:

Meaning: By looking at the past, acknowledging our mistakes and learning from them, we grow and attain new wisdom. The future waits to be unfolded by our positive action as we become “The Eighth Vessel” and receive powerful rejuvinating energies of rebirth.

Reading Points: Rejoice! A time of renewal and potential is here. The cycle of rebirth and healing brings inner peace and confidence. Once you accept that all the blessings and gifts of life can be your or, indeed, already belong to you, the fear of asking is gone. It is time to shed the skin of the past and accept and utilize the overflowing potential of the present that is freely available to you. Do not be afraid to make mistakes. Do not be afraid to ask: “Why not me?” See potential where others see barriers. See challenge as others see impossible odds. Apply all that you have learned through experience and toil to any problem and you will not fail. You have striven to survive and absorb insight; you have endured loss to retain your integrity. All of these trials have made you stronger, wiser, and more effective. Drink of this new fountain of opportunity and renew your life objectives. You have endured the past; its gifts were hard won. [N]ow the chalenge of the future unfolds. Grasp it and shape it in your hands as you would have it manifest in your life.

Which is a lot to consider.

What I hear Columbia saying through the five Tarot cards that I pulled is this:

She’s the American manifestation of an ancient and significant Goddess, now the genius locii of my city and this nation. She’s more deeply connected to the green, wilderness parts of my city and of this nation than many suspect. She “the goddess of the land, sometimes expressed as Sovereignty” and validates the leadership of legitimate government, bringing them their land’s version of the sacred sword and the Hallows of Britain. She’s a symbol of the “power and protection of the land.”

On the other hand, She’s still young, still ecstatic in her dance upon This Place, still performing her initiation ritual, still overwhelmed with bounty and connection. In spite of Her connection to older Goddesses, Columbia’s “freedom of spirit marks [her] out as an original and unique personality” one with a tendency to invasiveness in territories not her own.

What Columbia wants from her devotees, it seems to me, is a period of renewal and rebirth in which, using the wisdom that we’ve gained from prior generations, we accept her blessings and stop acting from fear. She wants her devotees to step up, to be unafraid of asking, “Why not me?” especially when Columbia’s principles (liberty, freedom, democracy, justice) are threatened. Columbia wants us to grasp the future “and shape it in your hands as you would have it manifest in your life.”

Makes sense.

I plan to do future trance workings to get to know Columbia even better. I feel the need to do them around significant American holidays, and I won’t be using Columbus Day, for, maybe, obvious reasons. Hopefully, the Thanksgiving Holiday (which I do consider an almost uniquely American holiday) will allow me some more time. In the meanwhile, your interpretations of the cards, in comments, are always welcome.

*This Wildwood Tarot card is a significant departure from the traditional Rider-Waite-based Eight of Cups, which shows an incomplete set of cups stacked beside flowing water and a person setting off in search of something more. I think it can be significant when, in a Tarot reading, the card selected varies from the traditional card. Here, there is a sense of more being avaliable, but it’s not based upon an incomplete or lacking past; it’s more abundant and optimistic than that. Of course, the card reminds me immediately of the Potomac River, which flows through Washington, D.C. and which I very much associate with Columbia.

Picture found here.

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3 responses to “Conversations with Columbia: Part Five

  1. “She’s more deeply connected to the green, wilderness parts of my city and of this nation than many suspect. She “the goddess of the land, sometimes expressed as Sovereignty” and validates the leadership of legitimate government, bringing them their land’s version of the sacred sword and the Hallows of Britain. She’s a symbol of the “power and protection of the land.”

    Those resonate. I love that the WNBA team for DC is the Mystics. And per the statue, what draws my eye most is that Columbia’s metallic headdress is adorned with feathers. Such design representation contradicts the notion of invasiveness as being in her nature whatsoever. Mystical energy does not invade. The practice is to inter-Be. Equilibrium, equanimity of an ecosystem formed and informed by recursive feedback loops that sustain ongoing emergence of niches and speciation; loops that ever-diminish, transform or eliminate pollutive tributaries or exploitive avenues should they form. The balance of scales.

    That her lineage is a paradox of old and new is instructive. Though Old Souls carry forth her energies like drawing water from a well, and her power in numbers count among Her, the Land and its inhabitants, still others in this Land would not yet know of Her, regardless of Her container, yet still they Will, if they but remember Her. Therein is the challenge.

    We as a Land may mature in step with Her, the foundation of which is knowing what is of Her and what is a projection or deflection upon Her. I recently read an article that “growth” per se, is not a panacea, muchless a worthy mantra. I was then reminded of the cycles of birth and death and renewal. Esoterically, if not exoterically, the key is that the essence of democracy from whatver vantage point/niche ideally remains the same, understood and practiced as mutually respectful mysticism (true Sovereignty). And just as I was writing this, an 8-legged friend walked across the carpet to where I am sitting. And I took her outside.

  2. I’ve loved this “series”. Thanks for posting it. (And i just found Donohue’s “To Bless the Space Between Us” in the library. Thank the gods we are still a country brave enough to have public libraries.)

  3. That is an intense picture. I have not seen that deck before.

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