HC SVNT DRACONES


Dragons.

Lately, I’m noticing dragons everywhere: on my G/Son’s t-shirt, in paintings, in cloud formations. I recently gave G/Son d’Aulaire’s book of Norse myths which has some great pictures of dragons. He asked me why people are always fighting the dragons. That’s a good question. Dragons breathe fire and fire can be dangerous.

Dragons keep coming to mind as I sit with my Bit of Earth and ground myself into this preternatural and extreme Spring we’re having here in the mystical MidAtlantic. Spring, which normally unfolds over a period of months seems to have happened in the course of a few days. I have jack-in-the-pulpits blooming now that normally don’t bloom until late April. The Japanese maples are leafed out already. My pots of mint, nettles, and parslies are already full of juicy green leaves. Even the birds seems to be courting earlier than usual; I’ve already seen the male cardinals feeding seeds to the female cardinals out by my birdfeeder. Yesterday, I worked for an hour pulling hairy bittercress (which seems determined to replace wood sorrel as the weed with which I will wage a war of attrition; it is edible and, as lamb’s cress, had magical uses, so perhaps I’ll learn to work with it) out of the herb bed, where the lavender, rosemary, and sage are already leafing out and where there’s volunteer dill wanting to be harvested already. The sandy soil was warm to the touch and the sun was so hot that I was sweating. In March.

And as I prepared the ground for French tarragon (“Artemisia dracunculus,” also known as “dragon’s wort,” back when “wort” or “wyrt” meant a plant), I kept thinking of dragons. The sun beating down so strongly, even though the Earth is still tilted towards Spring, was a dragon. The strange stirrings underneath the Earth that so many Witches are feeling nowadays when we ground was a dragon. And the heatwave spreading out from the Midwest and pushing my own Bit of Earth into the chaos of early birth was a dragon. I dug and pulled and composted and remembered Dune, that desert planet inhabited by giant worms (wyrms was an old expression for dragons) and how Chani, in one last desperate attempt to give birth, consumed so much Spice that her pregnancy accelerated, draining her, in the end. And I could feel Mother Earth engaging in the same desperate attempt to produce before the heat wave becomes too intense this summer and kills things off.

Late last night, as I performed Hecate’s Deipnon, I thought more about G/Son’s question. I wonder if there’s a way to cooperate with these dragons, to work with them, to begin to know and understand them. Because I don’t think they’re going back to sleep anytime soon.

We’ve gotten to that place on the map, it seems, where the old cartographers put the sign: Here Be Dragons. And it’s too late to turn this ship, Gaia, around in time to avoid them, I think. Should be interesting.

Picture found here.

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10 responses to “HC SVNT DRACONES

  1. “He asked me why people always fighting the dragons. ”

    I seem to remember, from “The Hobbit”, explanations that dragons raid settlements and carry off their precious metalworks — swords, crowns, jewels, chests of coin— which they then guard by sleeping on the pile. There is surely a 21st century equivalent to this…

  2. Don’t forget Tiamat in her last aspect, fighting for life and authority against Marduk.

  3. Re: Dragons in Tolkein.
    The dragons in Middle Earth were all created by the great evil god of the past, Morgoth, and were evil by nature.

    Re: Dragons as evil in general
    I don’t know of any good dragons in pre-modern Western literature, but the Chinese and other East Asian cultures believed in good dragons.

  4. For your possible interest:

    ‘The Sarf Ruth is the Cornish term for “Fire in the Land”. It is the dragon energy in the land – also known as ley lines — that flow to and from sacred places such as wells, crossroads, graveyards, sacred trees, etc.’ [Emphasis added]

    More here, and here.

  5. For your possible interest:

    ‘The Sarf Ruth is the Cornish term for “Fire in the Land”. It is the dragon energy in the land — also known as ley lines — that flow to and from sacred places such as wells, crossroads, graveyards, sacred trees, etc.

    ‘This “dragon energy” is drawn up from ley lines by use of the stang, which in Cornish tradition is called a gwelen. Walking the ley lines is one way to walk the Crooked (serpentine) Path.’

    More here and here.

  6. 2012 is the year of the Water Dragon according to Tibetan astrology.

  7. I have just written a little post about this on my blog. My thoughts follow pluky’s.

    I think the dragon represents the crone or grandmother creator aspect of the goddess and that is why young knights are always fighting her for the hand of her maid aspect.

    I think St George killing the dragon is symbolic of the victory of patriarchy over the goddess. A slaying that must be repeated every generation to stop her rising again.

    Nu Kua the Chinese creator goddess was symbolised as a serpent/dragon. Many creator goddesses are river or sea mermaid, come dragon goddesses; rivers themselves are great serpents of water moving across the land.

    Chi·me·ra also Chi·mae·ra
    1. Greek Mythology A fire-breathing she-monster usually represented as a composite of a lion, goat, and serpent.

    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Chimera

    Many chimera also have the wings of a great bird and I have always thought they might be composites of the sacred animals/totems of the ancient goddess civilisations.

    Maybe we should be on the dragons side?

  8. Maybe we–women, Witches, magic-workers–maybe we are the dragons. Perhaps we are those slow bluish wyrms that cool the fevered brow of the Earth. That being said–I’m planting broccoli, cabbage and more tomorrow, hoping to get in ahead of the insects. And I’m going to plant tomatoes earlier than I ever have.

  9. I tried to submit this yesterday–let’s see if WordPress will accept it today.

    ‘The Sarf Ruth is the Cornish term for “Fire in the Land”. It is the dragon energy in the land — also known as ley lines — that flow to and from sacred places such as wells, crossroads, graveyards, sacred trees, etc.

    ‘This “dragon energy” is drawn up from ley lines by use of the stang, which in Cornish tradition is called a gwelen. Walking the ley lines is one way to walk the Crooked (serpentine) Path.’

    More here, and here.

  10. Thank you for this writing. I believe long ago we used to work with the dragons. I work with the Green Dragon of Peace and Healing and the Blue Fire Dragon now, the latter being particularly good at communication issues in the electronic age. Perhaps the return of the dragons is a positive sign. It should at least keep things interesting!

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