Sense of Place Blogging

Dupont-HDR

* Politics and Prose is soliciting writing with a sense of place.

District Lines is an anthology intended to capture a sense of people and place in Washington, D.C. and the surrounding metropolitan areas. Once again, we’re accepting submissions—poems, essays, short stories, coherent musings and ramblings, scribbles, comics—that capture a sense of people or place in D.C. and the surrounding metropolitan neighborhoods. We’re also accepting submissions for cover and interior artwork—we welcome photographs, graphics, and other original pieces. Our motif is the iconic D.C. call box, so we especially welcome art that explores this image.

This is important work and I wish that more independent book stores did it.

* Here’s an interesting discussion with several poets about their sense of place.

* Wendell Berry and James Wright wrote about it.

*
Seamus Heaney
is quite aware that the sense of place and that “the relationship between a literature and a locale with its common language” are not a “particularly Irish phenomenon,” although the Irish do see to “get it.”

* My own place, Washington, D.C., my shining city on a swamp, has a long history of the poetry of place:

Langston Hughes worked in the early 1920s as a busboy at the Wardman Park Hotel in Washington, DC. One evening he left a sheaf of his poetry at the dining table of a hotel guest. That guest was Vachel Lindsay. Lindsay brought attention to Hughes’s work by reading three of his poems before an audience in the hotel’s little theater later that evening.

Not for nothing are some of our best cafes named Busboys and Poets.

What’s your place? Who are its poets? How does it influence your writing, your reading, your discussions?

Picture found here.

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One response to “Sense of Place Blogging

  1. I tried to find info about the “Sense of Place” Anthology on Politics & Prose site. Do you have a link specifically to what I’m assuming is a “call” for submissions to that anthology? (Or is my assumption wrong?)

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